Convenient Locations Apache Junction 480-485-9580 & Mesa 480-401-5175 or 480-448-8951

Hours Open : Monday to Friday - 7AM to 7PM & Open Saturdays

News

dentist's drill treating a sick tooth

Tooth Fillings

Tooth Fillings

What is a filling? Even though most people still associate this word with pain and fear, in today’s modern dentistry, geared toward patient’s comfort, a tooth filling is a common restorative procedure that helps repair and save teeth damaged by decay.

Dental fillings are not new. There are scientific discoveries suggesting that the oldest known dental filling may be dating to 13,000 years ago, made from a tar-like material. Another discovery of a 6,500 year old fossilized jawbone reveals that a crack on the canine tooth was stuffed with beeswax.

In the 19th century restorative dentistry starts using metals, such as gold, silver, tin, etc. that were softened to fill teeth. In 1819, a mercury based dental amalgam filling is created by the English chemist, Bell. In 1830, the mercury amalgam starts being used in the United States, and soon many harmful effects were reported. In 1859, what is today known as the American Dental Association is formed, a pro-mercury proponent.

Even though there were numerous findings about the harmful effect of mercury amalgams, only recently, in the 80s and the 90s, Germany, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark have banned the use of mercury amalgams. Starting July 1, 2018, amalgam use will be banned for children under 15 and for pregnant or nursing women in all countries of the European Union. Canada already has established guidelines for dentists discouraging the use of mercury amalgams on women and children.

During your dental exam, if any tooth decay is discovered by your dentist, he or she may recommend a filling. This is a procedure in which your dentist will remove the decayed portion of your tooth and fill the area with a tooth colored substrate. There are different filling compounds used for the procedure, for example: ceramics, glass ionomer, cast gold, composite resin, and silver. Silver/mercury fillings, which are easily noticeable when you open your mouth, tend to become darker with time. In the United States, although the FDA has determined that the level of mercury in the filling is safe for people over the age of six, most people prefer not to have a mercury/silver fillings done, given the variety of other options.

CV Dental Care is a mercury-free practice. Not only do we care about your smile, but also about the role your mouth plays in your overall health. There are many choices of dental materials, treatments, and alternatives to traditional dentistry like tooth fillings we offer to our patients, as we believe that everyone deserves a high quality of dental care.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
Man with digital tablet

Post Dental Treatment Care

Post Dental Treatment Care Instructions

Post Dental Treatment: Cosmetic Reconstruction

Remember that it will take time to adjust to the feel of your new bite. When the bite is altered or the position of the teeth is changed it takes several days for the brain to recognize the new position of your teeth or their thickness as normal. If you continue to detect any high spots or problems with your bite, call our office so we can schedule an adjustment appointment.

It is normal to experience some hot and cold sensitivity. The teeth require some time to heal after removal of tooth structure and will be sensitive in the interim. Your gums may also be sore for a few days. Warm salt water rinses (a teaspoon of salt in a cup of warm water) three times a day will reduce pain and swelling. A mild pain medication (one tablet of Tylenol or Ibuprofen (Motrin) every 3-4 hours) should ease any residual discomfort.

Don’t be concerned if your speech is affected for the first few days. You’ll quickly adapt and be speaking normally. You may notice increased salivation. This is because your brain is responding to the new size and shape of your teeth. This should subside to normal in about a week.

Daily brushing and flossing are a must for your new dental work. Daily plaque removal is critical for the long-term success of your new teeth, as are regular cleaning appointments.

Any food that can crack, chip or damage a natural tooth can do the same to your new teeth. Avoid hard foods and substances (such as beer nuts, peanut brittle, ice, fingernails, or pencils) and sticky candies. Smoking will stain your new teeth. Minimize or avoid foods that stain such as coffee, red wine, tea and berries.

If you engage in sports let us know so we can make a custom mouthguard. If you grind your teeth at night, wear the night guard we have provided for you. Adjusting to the look and feel of your new smile will take time. If you have any problems or concerns, please let us know. We always welcome your questions.

Post Dental Treatment: Crown and Bridge Appointments

Crowns and bridges usually take two or three appointments to complete. In the first visit, the teeth are prepared and molds of the mouth are taken. Temporary crowns or bridges are placed to protect the teeth while the custom restoration is being made. Since the teeth will be anesthetized, the tongue, lips and roof of the mouth may be numb. Please refrain from eating and drinking hot beverages until the numbness is completely worn off.

Occasionally a temporary crown may come off. Call us if this happens and bring the temporary crown with you so we can re-cement it. It is very important for the temporary to stay in place, as it will prevent other teeth from moving and compromising the fit of your final restoration.

To keep your temporaries in place, avoid eating sticky foods (gum), hard foods, and if possible, chew on the opposite side of your mouth. It is important to brush normally, but floss carefully and don’t pull up on the floss which may dislodge the temporary but pull the floss out from the side of the temporary crown.

It is normal to experience some temperature and pressure sensitivity after each appointment. The sensitivity should subside a few weeks after the placement of the final restoration. Mild pain medications may also be used as directed by our office.

If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent pain, or if you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office.

Post Dental Treatment: Tooth Extraction

After tooth extraction, it’s important for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding and begin the healing process. That’s why we ask you to bite on a gauze pad for 30-45 minutes after the appointment. If the bleeding or oozing still persists, place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 30 minutes. You may have to do this several times.

After the blood clot forms, it is important not to disturb or dislodge the clot as it aids healing. Do not rinse vigorously, suck on straws, smoke, drink alcohol or brush teeth next to the extraction site for 72 hours. These activities will dislodge or dissolve the clot and retard the healing process. Limit vigorous exercise for the next 24 hours as this will increase blood pressure and may cause more bleeding from the extraction site.

After the tooth is extracted you may feel some pain and experience some swelling. An ice pack or an unopened bag of frozen peas or corn applied to the area will keep swelling to a minimum. Take pain medications as prescribed. The swelling usually subsides after 48 hours.

Use the pain medication as directed. Call the office if the medication doesn’t seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time, even if signs and symptoms of infection are gone. Drink lots of fluid and eat nutritious soft food on the day of the extraction. You can eat normally as soon as you are comfortable.

It is important to resume your normal dental routine after 24 hours. This should include brushing and flossing your teeth at least once a day. This will speed healing and help keep your mouth fresh and clean.

After a few days you will feel fine and can resume your normal activities. If you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication, call our office immediately.

Post Dental Treatment: Composite Fillings (white fillings)

When an anesthetic has been used, your lips and tongue may be numb for several hours after the appointment. Avoid any chewing and hot beverages until the numbness has completely worn off. It is very easy to bite or burn your tongue or lip while you are numb.

It is normal to experience some hot, cold & pressure sensitivity after your appointment. Injection sites may also be sore. Ibuprofen (Motrin), Tylenol or aspirin (one tablet every 3-4 hours as needed for pain) work well to alleviate the tenderness. If pressure sensitivity persists beyond a few days or if the sensitivity to hot or cold increases, contact our office.

You may chew with your composite fillings as soon as the anesthetic completely wears off, since they are fully set when you leave the office.

If your bite feels uneven, if you have persistent pain, or if you have any other questions or concerns, please call our office.

In most cases, there is no need for prescription pain medication. If you have questions about drug or alcohol addiction please locate a provider by following this link.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
dental operation

Sedation Dentistry

Types of Sedation Dentistry

Intravenous Sedation (“Twilight Sedation”)

Our office offers our patients the option of Intravenous Sedation, also referred to as Dental Intravenous Anesthesia, or “Twilight Sedation,” for their dental treatment. This is what sets our office apart from other dental practices; it is our niche, if you will.

Intravenous Sedation or “twilight sleep” helps you to be comfortable and calm when undergoing dental procedures. Your treatment can be completed for you under intravenous sedation, if you so desire. Intravenous sedation or “IV sedation” (twilight sedation) is designed to better enable you undergo your dental procedures while you are very relaxed. It will enable you to tolerate as well as not remember those procedures that may be very uncomfortable for you. IV sedation will essentially help alleviate the anxiety associated with your treatment. You may not always be asleep but you will be comfortable, calm and relaxed, drifting in and out of sleep – a “twilight sleep”.

If you choose the option of intravenous sedation your IV sedation/anesthesia is administered and monitored by our expert doctors, therefore eliminating the costly expense of having your treatment carried out in an operating room or same-day surgical facility.

How is the IV Sedation Administered?

A thin needle will be introduced into a vein in your arm or hand. The needle will be attached to an intravenous tube through which medication will be given to help you relax and feel comfortable. At times a patient’s vein may not be able to sustain a needle for the length of the procedure. In this case, the medications will be administered and the needle retrieved. Both scenarios will achieve the same desired level of conscious sedation. Once again some patients may be asleep while others will slip in and out of sleep. Some patients with medical conditions and/or on specific drug regimens may only be lightly sedated and may not sleep at all.

The goal of IV sedation is to use as little medication as possible to get the treatment completed. With IV sedation, a constant “drip” is maintained via the intravenous tube. At any time an antidote can be administered to reverse the effects of the medications if necessary. IV sedation is very safe!

Along with IV sedation there are also different “levels” of sedation available to you in our office. There is nitrous oxide analgesia and oral sedation or nitrous oxide in combination with oral sedation – basically we can tailor the anesthesia to your need or desire. Once again, all modalities are administered and monitored by your doctor in the safety and comfort of our office environment.

Sedation dentistry is also a great option for the elderly, the disabled, or simply- the fearful!

Sedation Dentistry for the Elderly

As we age, our oral health becomes more important than ever. Periodontal disease can lead to bone and tooth loss, which affects nearly every part of our daily lives. To lead full and active lives, we need our teeth and gums. They allow us enjoy food, support speech and good conversation, and facilitate digestion. Our doctors are dedicated to treating elderly patients with care and commitment to comfort and health.

Elderly patients as a group tend to avoid dental visits for a variety of reasons, including: more pressing medical concerns, anxiety about treatment, the hardship of transportation, or fixed incomes. Once their oral health has reached an unmanageable point, fear and embarrassment further keep these patients away from the dentist.

For elderly patients embarrassed or fearful of their current oral state, sedation dentistry provides the opportunity for our doctors to treat these conditions while the patient remains relaxed and unaware until “awaking” to an improved oral state!

Sedation Dentistry for the Disabled

It may be especially difficult for people with disabilities to obtain access to proper dental care. They must find a dentist who is skilled and compassionate, and who can provide services for which some dentists may not be qualified. At CV Dental Care, we provide the expertise, state-of-the-art-equipment, and dedication to assisting special-needs patients necessary to ensuring great oral care for our patients.

Disabled patients may face added challenges in maintaining their oral health. Their disability may make it difficult to brush or floss regularly; they may also suffer a severe gag reflex, or dry mouth as a result of medication. Our doctors meet these challenges with sedation dentistry for the disabled. Our doctors are skilled in anesthesia for special-needs patients, and can ease the fear associated with out-of-control oral hygiene with one visit.

Sedation Dentistry for the Fearful

Dental phobia is a real, often overwhelming reality for thousands of people. Negative previous dental experiences, fear of needles or drills, and severe gag reflexes are just some of the reasons people feel extreme anxiety when thinking about visiting the dentist.

If you suffer from dental phobia- fear no more! At CV Dental Care, we are committed to understanding the very real nature of your fears. Not only will our staff treat you with delicacy and care, but IV sedation will allow you to experience dentistry in a whole new way. While engaging in a pleasant sleep-like experience, your doctor will be hard at work making sure you “wake up” with the results you desire.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
Female patient at the dentist having local anesthesia

Oral Sedation

Types of Oral Sedation

Do you experience high levels of anxiety when visiting the dentist? You may be a candidate for Sedation Dentistry. We have multiple doctors who are Board Certified to administer (oral conscious) sedation, commonly referred to as “Sleep Dentistry.”

Sedation Dentistry

Advantages to patients include:

  • Treatment is completed when you are in a more relaxed mood.
  • You will have less difficulty sitting through a lengthy procedure.
  • Multiple treatments and full mouth restorations can occur at during the same visit.
  • Less discomfort after treatment.

Anti-Anxiety Pills

The most commonly prescribed dental related drugs that treat anxiety belong to the “benzodiazepine” family. Drugs such as Valium, Halcion, Xanax, or Ativan. These drugs decrease anxiety by binding and toning down activity within “fear” receptors in the brain.

There are two different types of Benzodiazepines:

  • Sedative-Hypnotics: These drugs induce calm, including drowsiness and even sleep. This sleep state is actually a form of hypnosis which is a form of physiological sleep.
  • Anti-Anxiety Drugs: These are drugs which relieve anxiety and induce a state of calm and relaxation.

While benzodiazepines act as sedatives AND anti-anxiety drugs, some are highly targeted at areas within the brain which focus on sleep. Others act in a more specific way and target fear centers in the brain.   In most cases, higher doses act as sedatives and induce sleep, while in lower doses, they reduce anxiety without sedation.

Benzodiazepines are also Central Nervous System (CNS) depressants (i.e. there can be a decline in blood pressure and breathing). It is important to note that they shouldn’t be mixed with other CNS depressants such as alcohol. Its important that you utilize the dose your dentist or doctor recommends. It is possible to overdose, and overdoses could lower your breathing to dangerously low levels, which could result in coma or death.

Please note that you shouldn’t travel on your own after you’ve taken any of these drugs. Make sure you have an escort, even if you traveled by bus or foot! It’s easy to become disorientated.

When not to take benzodiazepines:

Some of these drugs can affect your liver and heart. It’s important to check with your practitioner and/or pharmacist.  You should be sure to inform your doctor or dentist if any of the following apply: known allergy to the drug, narrow-angle glaucoma, pregnancy, severe respiratory disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), impaired kidney or liver function, depression/bipolar disorder/psychoses, chronic bronchitis and some other conditions. It’s also important to let us know if you are taking other medications. There could be possible drug interactions.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
Inhalation Sedation

Nitrous Oxide (laughing gas)

Nitrous Oxide is a sweet-smelling, non-irritating, colorless gas which you can breathe.

Nitrous Oxide has been the primary means of sedation in dentistry for many years. Nitrous oxide is safe, the patient receives 50-70% oxygen with no less than 30% nitrous oxide.

The patient is able to breathe on their own and remain in control of all bodily functions.

The patient may experience mild amnesia and may fall asleep, not remembering all of what happened during their appointment.

Advantages to using Nitrous Oxide

  • The depth of sedation can be altered at any time to increase or decrease sedation.
  • There is no after effect such as a “hangover”.
  • Inhalation sedation is safe with no side effects on your heart and lungs, etc.
  • Inhalation sedation is very effective in minimizing gagging.
  • It works rapidly as it reaches the brain within 20 seconds. In as little as 2-3 minutes its relaxation and pain killing properties develop.

Disadvantages to using Nitrous Oxide

You should not utilize Nitrous Oxide if you have been diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Though there are no other major contraindications to using nitrous oxide, you may not want to use it if you have emphysema, exotic chest problems, M.S., a cold or other difficulties with breathing.

You may want to ask your dentist for a “5 minute trial” to see how you feel with this type of sedation method before proceeding.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
Tooth toon

Dental Sealants

Dental sealant is a thin protective coating that is placed on the permanent back teeth and helps protect them from bacteria and plaque—the two main causes of tooth decay. Painted on the chewing surface of the teeth, the sealant quickly bonds into the depressions and grooves, acting as a protective layer and shield over the enamel of each tooth.

Statistics show that approximately 80% of tooth decay in school children occurs in molars’ pits and fissures (or grooves)—areas that are often difficult to clean thoroughly. Applying a sealant as early as the permanent molars come in is a very effective and proven way of preventing tooth decay. When dental sealant bonds into the groove of the tooth, it makes the tooth surface smoother and easier to brush, thus more resistant to the formation of decay.

In addition to the premolars and molars—the back teeth which have the deepest grooves—any type of tooth with irregular surface that allows for accumulation of debris may be sealed. The best candidates for dental sealants are children and teenagers, however adults with a minimal tooth decay can also greatly benefit from the procedure.

Applying sealant is a painless and simple procedure and may be covered by some insurance providers. Sealants can protect teeth from decay for up to 10 years, but they need to be checked for chipping or wearing at regular dental check-ups. How long a sealant lasts depends on the temperature, the type of food a child eats and how they chew. Your dentist can replace sealants as necessary.

Removing dental sealants is not necessary as they wear away over time, and then new sealants can be applied. What kind of dental sealant material is used? The majority of dental sealants are made with liquid resin and the ADA confirms that they are safe. There has been concern, however, that most dental sealants contribute to a very low BPA (bisphenol) exposure for a few hours after the dental sealant procedure. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry compiled the following list of BPA-free dental sealants and the manufacturer, and parents can request Bisphenol-A (BPA)-free dental sealant material when taking their child to the dentist or check with their dental provider.

BPA-free dental sealants (manufacturer):

Aegis (Bosworth)
Clinpro (3M ESPE)
Conseal F (Southern Dental Industries)
Conseal Sealant (Southern Dental Industries)
Delton Light Cure (Dentsply Professional)
Delton (Dentsply Professional)
Ecuseal (Zenith)
Embrace Wet Bond (Pulpdent Corporation)
Fluroshield (Dentsply Caulk)
Fuji Triage Glass Ionomer (GC America, Inc.)
Guardian Seal (Kerr Corp.)
Helioseal F (Vivadent)
Helioseal (Ivoclar Vivadent)
LC (Dentonics)
Natural Elegance (Henry Schein Inc.)
Pit & Fissure Sealant Kit (Carlisle)
Prisma-Shield (Dentsply)
Riva Protect Glass Ionomer (Southern Dental Industries) Sealant (Bisco)
Seal-Rite (Pulpdent)
UltraSeal XT plus (Ultradent Products, Inc.).

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

• dental sealants
• what's dental sealants
• dental sealant
• sealants teeth
• tooth sealant
• what is a tooth sealant
• sealant teeth
• what is sealant for teeth
• tooth sealants
• teeth sealant
• dental sealants pros and cons
• dental sealants pros cons
• dental sealant safety
• are dental sealants safe
• teeth sealants

• dental sealants children
• dental sealants adults
• dental sealants for adults
• dangers dental sealants
• dangers of dental sealants
• seal teeth
• sealants dental
• are dental sealants
• sealant tooth
• sealant dental
• are sealants
• are sealants teeth
• sealing teeth
• dental sealants procedure
• children dental sealants

• teeth sealants children
• sealants kids
• dental sealants kids
• dental sealant application
• dental sealants safety
• teeth sealants for children
• apply dental sealants
• sealant per tooth
• ada dental sealants
• dental sealer
• silicone sealer
• are dental sealants toxic
• dental sealant procedure
• dental sealant side effects
• types dental sealants

Read More
Male dentist on working place in dental practice

Tooth Extractions

At CV Dental Care, we are dedicated to helping you preserve as many of your natural teeth as possible. Protecting and improving the health of your smile is our first priority. There are times, however, when removing an impacted tooth is unavoidable. If one of your teeth is severely damaged, it may be necessary to extract the tooth to prevent any further complications.

A tooth extraction is most commonly required if:

  • A tooth is deeply decayed or in the advanced stages of gum disease
  • A tooth does not respond to a root canal therapy
  • A tooth has extensive bone loss
  • A tooth has a fractured root
  • A tooth is broken beyond repair
  • A tooth is poorly positioned, such as an impacted or problematic wisdom tooth
  • Erupting wisdom teeth interfere with the orthodontic alignment of teeth

We understand that replacing missing teeth or whether to do so at all may be a challenging decision for many patients. There is a number of negative consequences patients can suffer over time, if they decide against tooth replacement: shifting teeth that affect the bite and cause difficulty chewing, an empty space noticeable in a smile, or even further damage to the adjoining teeth. We strongly advise replacing the missing tooth or teeth with an implant, fixed bridge, or denture as soon as possible.

Тhe Tooth Extractions Process

Before removing your tooth, your dentist will numb the area—jawbone and gums– where the tooth will be removed, using a local anesthetic. If several or all of your teeth need to be removed, a stronger, general anesthetic may be used. Your dentist will insert special tools between the tooth and gum surrounding the tooth, moving it back and forth within the socket (the bone that encases the tooth’s root) until it separates from the ligament that holds the tooth in place. You’ll feel a lot of pressure during this process without feeling pain. This is because the anesthetic has numbed the nerves stopping the transference of pain, yet the nerves that transmit pressure are not profoundly affected. The whole procedure should take minutes to complete. Let your dentist know if you do feel pain at any time during the extraction.

After the extraction, you need to bite on a gauze pad for 30-45 minutes to allow for a blood clot to form to stop the bleeding. You may need to place another gauze pad and bite firmly for another 30 minutes, if the bleeding still persists. You may have to do this several times to restrain the flow of blood. Avoid rinsing vigorously, sucking on straws, smoking, drinking alcohol, or brushing teeth next to the extraction site for 72 hours. As there may be some pain and swelling after the extraction, an ice pack applied to the area will keep swelling to a minimum. The swelling usually subsides after 48 hours.

Use the prescribed pain medication as directed. Call our office if the medication doesn’t seem to be working. If antibiotics are prescribed, continue to take them for the indicated length of time even if signs and symptoms of infection are gone. Drink lots of fluids and eat nutritious, soft food on the day of the extraction. It is important to resume your normal dental routine after 24 hours, including brushing and flossing at least once a day. This will speed healing process and help keep your mouth fresh and clean.

Call our office immediately if you have heavy bleeding, severe pain, continued swelling for 2-3 days, or a reaction to the medication.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
Tablet with the diagnosis Periodontitis on the display

Gum Disease

Nearly half of the population in the United States is affected by periodontitis, which is the leading cause of tooth loss among adults over the age of 35.

When plaque buildup from food and bacteria hardens around the teeth and gums, it causes inflammation, sensitivity, and bleeding of the gums’ soft tissues. Over time pockets can form between the teeth and gums, giving an entryway to bacteria into the bloodstream and subsequently to the rest of the body. Advanced stages of gum disease can also cause tooth loss and make a person more vulnerable to health problems like heart disease, diabetes, gastric ulcers, lung disease, weakened immune system, stroke, and premature child birth. Periodontal Therapy is therefore vital for preserving one’s health signs and well-being.

Read More
3D dental implant

Dental Bridges

A dental bridge is a type of partial denture, a solid restorative structure that “bridges a gap” between two teeth. Bridges are supported by natural teeth or implants and are an excellent way to replace missing teeth. They can be either permanently attached or are removable.

Fixed bridges do not come out. They are not removable, although they may need to be re-cemented or replaced. Fixed bridges are applied by either placing crowns on the abutment teeth, or by resin bonding the artificial teeth directly to the abutment teeth. They help preserve facial shape, restore chewing and smiling, and prevent the neighboring teeth from drifting.

A removable bridge (removable partial denture) is made of artificial teeth with small precision attachments on either side that anchor them to the neighboring teeth. Removable bridges are easier to clean than the fixed bridges but slightly less retentive.

Why do I need a bridge?

Any patient who has lost a tooth or multiple teeth but still has some natural teeth and is in decent oral health can benefit from a bridge. Bridges are naturally and realistically looking, and often help improve the patient’s facial structure and smile. One of the most important reasons for a bridge is maintaining good dental health. When a tooth or several teeth are missing, chewing is difficult and puts unusual stress on the remaining teeth and gum tissues, which can cause a number of potentially harmful disorders, including bone loss. A bridge can minimize the development of gum disease—a side effect due to missing teeth.

How is a dental bridge attached?

It usually takes two to three appointments to complete the procedure.

  • During the first appointment, your dentist will reshape the abutment teeth on either side of the gap by removing a portion of the enamel and dentin from the tooth surface and reducing their size. A local anesthetic is injected to the teeth to make the procedure more comfortable.
  • Impressions of the teeth are taken to ensure correct bite and match the opposing teeth. The impressions are then sent to the lab where the custom-fit bridge will be crafted.
  • The finished bridge is adjusted to ensure proper fitting and then permanently cemented to the natural teeth with crowns covering the abutment teeth, and the missing tooth is replaced by a pontic (false tooth.) The prosthetic structure is solid and keeps the surrounding teeth from shifting.

What materials are used?

Dental bridges can be constructed from gold alloys, non-precious alloys, porcelain, or a combination of these materials. Porcelain is often bonded to either precious or non-precious metal.

How do I take care of my bridge?

Dental bridges require a good oral health care, as teeth covered by crowns are also susceptible to tooth decay. Additionally, cleaning under the pontic (missing tooth) is also very important. Regular brushing and flossing are critical, as plaque can accumulate and lead to gingivitis and gum disease. Good daily home care and regular dental checkups can help minimize or prevent oral health problems.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More
3D_Dental implant

Dental Implants

Adults can loose teeth for a number of reasons: trauma, tooth grinding, poor nutrition, gum disease, and serious illness, such as diabetes or autoimmune disease. Missing teeth can impair the ability to chew and digest food properly and has serious emotional and psychological consequences for one’s self esteem and quality of life.

Dental implants replace missing tooth roots, help preserve the bone and facial structure, and provide the strength and stability that is required to chew virtually any food without struggling. A dental implant procedure is considered the best solution for people missing one tooth or an entire mouthful of teeth. Dental implants can last much longer than any other dental restorative work, even a lifetime, if properly taken care of.

A dental implant is a titanium pin–an artificial tooth root implanted into the jawbone through a painless and simple procedure. Implants are customized based on your particular oral situation. They are strong, fully functional, and prevent further tooth decay. Strategically placed in the jawbone where the teeth are missing, they osseointegrate, or fuse with it to form a strong and long-lasting foundation for your replacement teeth. Dental implants can enhance your natural smile and help preserve your facial structure from bone deterioration.

Dental implants offer the health and aesthetic benefits of permanent, naturally functioning tooth replacements. Whether you are missing one tooth, multiple teeth, or all of your teeth, CV Dental Care offers a reliable tooth replacement option.

Evaluation for Dental Implants

If getting dental implants is your preferred choice for restoring your natural smile, at CV Dental Care, as part of your evaluation, we ask that you undergo a comprehensive medical history, dental and radiographic examination. We do this to make sure we have a full understanding of your overall medical and dental health, and to determine what is required to make dental implants a success for you. During these consultation visits, your specific needs and considerations will be addressed by either one of our highly skilled doctors or by an Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon referred by our practice.

Dental Implant Procedure

The placement of dental implants usually requires two surgical procedures. First, the dental implants are surgically placed into the jawbone. For two to six months following the surgery, the implants are below the surface of the gums and gradually integrating with the jawbone. A temporary prosthesis (dentures) may be recommended so you can eat soft foods.

After the implants have bonded to the bone, your surgeon will remove the gum tissue over the implants and place a small healing collar. After the gum tissue has healed for two weeks, your dentist is ready to start making your new teeth. A post or abutment will be attached to the implant for the replacement tooth to sit on. The dentist will take an impression to have the replacement tooth fabricated. The entire procedure for the implant placement to the final replacement tooth can take up to six to eight months. Most patients do not experience any disruption in their daily life.

Schedule an appointment with a CV Dental Care provider by filling out this contact form or call us at 480-467-3618.

Read More